Travel

Family Travel is the Ultimate Education

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The lads in Kyoto -

As the sun broke over Vietnam’s East Sea horizon, my son and I gave one final tug to the coracle, securing it on the shore. The weathered fisherman, to whom the boat belonged, gave us an appreciative smile before uncovering his overnight haul. Tristan’s eyes went wide as he was staring at the cornucopia of sea creatures littering the floor. We were thousands of miles from our house in Zurich, but we could not have felt more at home.

My wife, Claudia, and I are uniquely blessed with being in professions that allow us to travel; and as a result, our sons are already frequent flyers. Tristan, 8, began flying at eight-weeks-old and Conrad, 4, hit the skies at three months. They now have a combined 200,000 air miles between them. They are both enrolled in our family world-schooling program where the opportunities for bonding and endless adventures create everlasting memories.

Read the remainder of our family travel article at the Luxe Getaway link below:

https://luxegetaways.com/family-travel-outcast-otter/

The best family hotels in France

Finding accommodation that suits both adults and children isn't always easy. Leonie Glass suggests 50 hotels that everyone will enjoy in five of France's most family-friendly regions.

If you're keen to avoid the drudgery of self-catering family holidays, but are fed up with frosty greetings when checking into hotels with your children, you need to find somewhere to stay where you will all feel comfortable. Not a snooty place, where staff or other guests shush your children if they run down a corridor, or somewhere full of low-lying precious objects that invite disaster. And not a hotel where the accommodation is so basic that all of you have to squeeze into a tiny airless box. Here are some genuinely family-friendly places in France that parents and children can both enjoy. Unless stated otherwise, prices are for a double room, including breakfast, in high season.

SeaBubbles: The Flying River Taxi

The egg-shaped flying river taxi is gaining support, as SeaBubbles seeks to close its third funding round in under a year and aims to firm up interest from potential customers, including the city of Paris and companies in the San Francisco Bay.

To build the first battery-powered bubble-shaped ships that hover a few inches above the water and transport as many as six people at a time, founders Alain Thebault and Anders Bringdal last month raised 3.45 million euros ($3.6 million) from French insurer Maif and venture-capital fund Partech Ventures. 

To read more visit Bloomberg Technology: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-11/flying-river-taxis-eye-customers-from-the-seine-to-san-francisco

 

 

Keeping the Ritz Paris Running

Christian Boyens has worked at some of the world’s most prestigious hotels including the Kempinski in Hamburg and The Peninsula Beverly Hills. He joined the Ritz Paris as general manager in 2011 and spearheaded the hotel’s four-year, US$400 million renovation.

Why Bilinguals Are Smarter

SPEAKING two languages rather than just one has obvious practical benefits in an increasingly globalized world. But in recent years, scientists have begun to show that the advantages of bilingualism are even more fundamental than being able to converse with a wider range of people. Being bilingual, it turns out, makes you smarter. It can have a profound effect on your brain, improving cognitive skills not related to language and even shielding against dementia in old age.

This view of bilingualism is remarkably different from the understanding of bilingualism through much of the 20th century. Researchers, educators and policy makers long considered a second language to be an interference, cognitively speaking, that hindered a child’s academic and intellectual development.

To read the rest of this compelling article click on the NYT article:

The Rolls Royce Wraith

Thank you Zurich Rolls Royce for making the day of two future potential drivers - the Wraith is truly a remarkable motor car.

Kenyan Author Joins Team

We are thrilled to welcome Mr. Stanley Gazemba, Kenyan author and journalist, featured in the New York Times and on NPR, to our Kenyan literacy team.

Mr. Gazemba brings incredible insight to the problems of children's literacy in the Sub-Saharan country, and will provide his creative talents to our new Outcast Otter Kenyan characters and children's book series.

Indonesia's Artisitic Boutique Hotel

Katamama is a boutique hotel made by artisans. Every detail has been handmade or handpicked, using Indonesia’s centuries-old traditions interpreted in a modern and timeless context. All private suites are our expression of understated luxury. This attention to detail and craftsmanship accompanies our five star service delivered in a personalised and warm style by a family of individuals passionate about their craft.

South Pacific Island: Kiribatis Bets On Solar

BUARIKI, KIRIBATI — As late as 1990, nightfall in Kiribati (pronounced “Kiribass”), a patchwork of tiny islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, was accompanied by a peculiar odor. More than 60 per cent of the country’s 103,000 people had no electricity, and whenever dusk fell, many of them would light greasy kerosene lamps in order to see.

The kerosene fumes were unavoidable, villagers recalled, and the light was not quite suitable for weaving or reef fishing — two economic activities that are central to village livelihoods. “Uncomfortable and annoying,” recalled Roniti Piripi, a villager on North Tarawa, a two-hour boat ride from the grid-connected capital in South Tarawa.

But in 1991, an agent from a government company came to his village, Buariki, and offered to lease him a solar home system for a one-time payment of US$52 and regular monthly payments of $7. Piripi said he leapt at the opportunity and hasn’t looked back. The solar system that he leased 25 years ago now powers his family’s home and dry-goods shop on Buariki’s unpaved main street. They also have a second solar panel from the energy company, which they purchased for around $170, and several hand-held solar lights (donated to 10,000 Kiribati households last year by the Taiwanese government).

To read the full article: http://powerstruggle.discoursemedia.org/investigation/kiribatis-solar-future-bright-spots-and-dark-patches-in-the-south-pacific/